Nashville is coming up soon!  As I prepare my speech “Nothing Is As It Seems” for the Big I Conference on Inclusive Theology, I’ve been contemplating how maintaining this stance in the world is so helpful … soothing actually.

Invited to the Big I to speak about my experience with the Zulu of South Africa, it’s easy – easy NOW – to see how nothing was what it seemed to be in RUBY’S WORLD.  The underlying current of ancient traditions permeated modern, every day life in ways I couldn’t see – and my blindness contributed to being run out of the village under threat for my life!

Most of us won’t ever encounter witch doctors and tribal chiefs.  Nor will we be flummoxed by rituals that have no power in our realm of consciousness.  But many of us will innocently undermine the value of others’ belief systems when we find ourselves in unfamiliar circumstances.

So it turns out that the lessons of RUBY’S WORLD are good for all of us:

Be quick to ask questions
Be slow to make judgments
Take nothing at surface value

A friend sent me this story, and I’m excited to pass it on.  Please post a reply with your “WE WILL SEE” story – and inspire all of us to believe in something bigger than the moment.

WE  WILL  SEE
     A man has a horse that jumps the fence and runs away.  His friends say, “Oh, too bad your horse left.  Now you have no horse to work for you.”
     The man says, “Well maybe.  We will see.”  
     Then the horse returns months later, pregnant and gives birth to a foal.  The man’s friends say, “Oh, you are so lucky.  You lost one horse and now you have two!”  
     The man says, “Well maybe.  We will see.”
     Then the man’s son is riding the young horse and it bucks and he falls and breaks his leg.  The friends say, “Oh, too bad your young horse left your son with a broken leg. How unfortunate.”
     And the man says, “Well maybe.  We will see.”  
     Then the army comes to take young men of the village to be soldiers, but the man’s son can’t go with a broken leg.  The friends say, “Wow, how lucky are you!  Your son has to stay at home because of his broken leg.”
     “Well maybe.  We will see …”